Archive for April, 2019

Why Doctors and Librarians Make Great Partners

April 20, 2019

readingI found an interesting article about the importance of reading to your young child in a recent edition of Publishers Weekly. It’s a great reminder for parents…

New Passover titles for children

April 18, 2019

The JTA (Jewish Telegrapic Agency) suggests these five new titles for children this Passover.

A Seder for Grover, Pippa’s Passover Plate, The Best Four Questions, Matzah Belowstairs, and Shimri’s Big Idea: A Story of Ancient Jerusalem. Recommended for ages 1-4, share these colorful stories this season to celebrate the spring holiday with the little ones in your life. Grover from Sesame stars in “A Seder for Grover.” Miriam Mouse and family stars in “Matzah Belowstairs.” Marcy in “The Best Four Questions” is excited to ask the four questions for the first time at this year’s family seder. Pippa mouse in “Pippa’s Passover Plate” explains some of the Passover rituals in rhyme. Ancient Jerusalem is the setting of “Shimri’s Big Idea” when young Shimri is put off by his elders who tell him he is too young to help his people. Enjoy!

Eat That Frog! 21 Great Ways to Stop Procrastinating and Get More Done In Less Time

April 17, 2019

frogThe good news is that there is always hope for changing a  “bad” habit. The bad news is that it is going to take a lot of self discipline. Author Brian Tracey explains his theory of “eating a frog” as tackling the task with the highest priority (a.k.a., the one you least want to to do).  He speaks from experience, having turned his life around from a series of dead end jobs to become a successful sales manager. Tracey’s first point is to prioritize your tasks, and to dive into the one with the highest priority first. I am optimistic that by reading this book, I will be able to change this very unhelpful habit of procrastination, and be able to manage my time (and life) more effectively. Stay tuned…

What I Leave Behind

April 16, 2019

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What I Leave Behind by Alison Mcghee is a great book for reluctant readers (especially boys!). After his dad commits suicide, Will tries to overcome his own misery by secretly helping the people around him in this story made up of one hundred chapters of one hundred words each. He lives with his mother and walks every day to his job at the local dollar store where he gets little gifts for the people in his life as an attempt to fix the wrongs in their lives.

This book was emotional but beautiful. The short format makes each word more important. I really enjoyed reading this book!

State of America’s Libraries 2019

April 14, 2019

The April 2019 issue of American Libraries Magazine includes some interesting tidbits in an article concerning the state of our libraries. In fact, one listing of data jumped out as I was reading it, since the heading proclaimed: “Public libraries strengthen local economies,” listing how we as librarians accomplish this impressive fact. Here are a few examples given: first, by providing technology training (84% of libraries do so), by aiding patrons with the completion of government online forms (97%), as well as supplying online health resources (77%) and offering programs on health topics. Perhaps we as public librarians need to become better cheerleaders for self-promotion…


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