A Word for Love

April 25, 2017 by

bookThis debut novel by Emily Robbins describes the story of love. Bea is an America student who has travelled to Syria to study the language and to read “the astonishing text”, an ancient manuscript that is said to cause tears in the eyes of its reader. However, a real-life love story takes place right before her eyes: Nisrine, the maid in the house where Bea is living, falls in love with the policeman guarding the building next door, the very same man that Bea has had her eye on. The novel has myriad themes besides love; it also contains issues such as oppression of women, war, revolution, but also kindness and the importance of family and culture. The lyrical prose is a pleasure to read, and it gives important insights into a different culture.

Born a Crime

April 25, 2017 by

I recently read The Daily Show anchor Trevor Noah’s memoir Born a Crime about his upbringing in South Africa and I would HIGHLY recommend it! index.jpg

I went into it expecting it to be laugh out loud hilarious but was pleasantly surprised to be far more interested in his compelling stories. Noah was born towards the end of Apartheid but his experiences as a mixed-race person are fascinating. As someone whose knowledge of racial relations in South Africa pretty much end with the fact that -yes, Apartheid has ended- I found the nuances of the state of racial prejudice there to be illuminating.

 Whether subsisting on caterpillars for dinner during hard times, being thrown from a moving car during an attempted kidnapping, or just trying to survive the life-and-death pitfalls of dating in high school, Trevor illuminates his curious world with an incisive wit and unflinching honesty. 

The man we see today who is  handsome, intelligent, and full of wit is only more appealing once reading about his rough upbringing. EVERYONE SHOULD READ THIS BOOK!

Bull

April 24, 2017 by

It is National Poetry Month and yes, even in YA land we are acknowledging it! I recently read Bull by David Elliott which is a re-imagining of the timeless story of Theseus and the Minotaur for a new generation. Oh, and it is written in verse. Do not let this scare you! The story is hilarious, bawdy, and filled with the drama that we knows and love from index.jpgclassic Greek myths.

For people who are weary readers, novels written in verse are a great option because they are short (I read this book in about an hour – but that is also because it was so funny that I couldn’t put it down). So give it a try!

The Cutaway

April 22, 2017 by

bookA first novel by Christina Kovac, The Cutaway is a fast-paced crime drama that centers around a news producer, Virginia, who finds herself caught up in a murder. Evelyn Carney, a young D.C. lawyer, goes missing and her body is later discovered among the reeds of the Potomac River. While chasing the story, Virginia is drawn into unraveling the threads of the crime, which involves some heavy hitters: two partners at the firm where Evelyn worked, the D.C. chief of police, and a politician. Having a photogenic memory for faces, Virginia is positive that she had seen the victim while working a story, and is determined to find her killer.

The author has a 17 year history in news, working for Fox 5, ABC and NBC, including shows like Meet the Press, the Today show and Nightly News, and has turned out a superb first effort.

“Crooked Street” by Priscilla Masters

April 20, 2017 by

Crooked Street    A woman calls the police station to report that her husband of two years hasn’t returned home from work. She’s upset. He would never run out on her. Detective Inspector Joanna Piercy gets the call. She assumes the man will be home soon and explain his lateness. But the man does not return. As D.I. Piercy begins to find out where the man is, she discovers his perfect façade has cracks. He is not the perfect husband his wife thought he was. D.I. Percy’s boyfriend is asking to make their relationship more solid as well. Though Joanne loves him dearly, moving house and expanding their family makes her apprehensive. This is the 13th Joanna Piercy mystery, but my first. I enjoyed the build-up of learning more about the people living in the neighborhood as the mystery was pieced together.  The crime was secondary to character development. I would definitely read another by Masters.


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